The March of Technology

I was reminded today of a speech I had listened to last year.  At the time it seemed very strange, but now it means even more.  Boris Johnson at the UN in September 2019 :-

Of course these things aren’t normally of much interest, but often it’s where the agenda is presented. Just as the agricultural era was usurped by the industrial era, so we are witnessing the death of the industrial era and the start of the information era.  I suppose, given my career choices, I should be pleased there is a demand for my skills.  Interestingly, when I researched my own family tree I found one of my own family branches were victims of the agricultural to industrial switch.  It seems they were sheep farmers out on the Yorkshire moors and lived in a decent manor house (1851 census).  From there, it was possible to track the decline of the family through ever decreasing properties in each census until my great-grandmother emerged in lodgings with her sister in 1901 in Consett.  It’s actually where she met my great-grandfather.  Their original manor house property is still there and is rumoured to have once been lost in a bet.  I can only wonder at the desperation there must have been behind that story (if true).  In what can be seen now as a major switch in policy to get the UK even more focused on manufacturing instead of agriculture, the corn laws were repealed in 1830 or so.  This meant cheaper and cheaper agricultural imports undermined local farmers, while at the exact same time, the opening up of empire brought ever more wool imported from Australia.  A UK farmer would have seen demand for their product fall precipitously and at the same time seen their traditional workforce head off to new industrial jobs in local cities like Leeds.  A lethal combination.  As may well be proven by the absence of the male head of the household in the 1861 census compared to 1851.

Especially of interest is the reference to Prometheus, the creator of mankind itself.  So pleased was he with his creation, that he gifted it fire, so it could develop civilisation.  This was the mention that first made me listen to it back in 2019, when it was first put out there.  To me, legends may be legends but somewhere within are grains of truth.  Mankind has been given a new fire, the technology to change it’s life, but will the fire be good or bad?

Technology is marching onwards and Data is the New oil. It seems to me that the march wasn’t fast enough and something was needed to push it forward faster.  Much like the industrial era being held back by potential new workers/slaves still working on jobs considered to be part of previous era, who then need to be “freed up”, along with their resources.  Of course, there’ll always be a need for manufactured goods, just as there is a still a need for food (although with this one, just look at the agenda to demonise meat and get everyone eating plants, frankenfoods grown in a lab and potentially insects), but these industries only employ a fraction of the numbers they traditionally needed before.

You don’t need to be particularly insightful to see who some of the real winners of this Corona crisis are.  While traditional shops, pubs and restaurants are bad, apparently shopping online, especially at Amazon is fine.  While everyone switches to digital means of communication and work, you can only imagine how much data places like Google have been able to gather lately.  It’s a goldmine.  Meanwhile, Microsoft continues to push for mandatory vaccinations and it’s vile ID 2020 proposal.  Get your Certificate of Vaccine ID (COVID) here.  Implanted inside your body somehow, preferably.  Yes, silicon valley is doing very nicely, thank you.  To see what’s planned next, check out this vile patent for cryptocurrency attached to humanity itself.  There will be no respite or hiding place if that becomes reality.

I’ll stick by what I said before, we are on the verge – well, it’s already started – of a huge struggle between ethics and technology.  Unfortunately, having seen the response of many to the recent loss of freedom, I don’t expect much ethics from anyone.  Individuals do surprise occasionally though.  I sold something on fb marketplace (data mined, no doubt) and the person who bought it was so pleased with his purchase that he insisted on shaking my hand.  To me, that was good mix of ethics (free trade), humanity (shaking hands) and technology (fb facilitating the transaction).  I believe though, that the first two are under threat big time.  Time will prove me right or wrong.

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